Annapolis Update — 1/10/14

Dear Friend,

Members of the Maryland General Assembly returned to session on Wednesday and we’re already in full swing. Today I cosponsored legislation that would raise the minimum wage in Maryland to $10.10 by 2016. Increasing the minimum wage is vitally important to our working families and is one of two things that we must accomplish this session. The other is securing school construction funding for Montgomery County. Our schools are over capacity and are adding roughly 2,500 students a year — the equivalent of a new high school. If we truly value education we must ensure that our children have adequate facilities, and the status quo is simply not acceptable.

Other legislation that I am working on:

Maryland Animal Welfare Act
Like us, animals are sentient beings and have needs that are not being uniformly met across the state. From factory farms, to roadside zoos, to laboratories, animals suffer needlessly every day. This bill would require those that own or care for animals to provide for five basic welfare needs: a suitable diet; a suitable environment; the ability to exhibit normal behavioral patterns; to be housed with, or apart, from other animals; and protection from pain, suffering, and injury or disease.

Poultry Fair Share Act – Cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay!
Runoff from chicken farms contributes significant pollution into the Chesapeake Bay, but poultry companies are doing very little to help with the cleanup costs. This bill would charge poultry companies $0.05 per bird and the funds would go to the Chesapeake Bay Restoration Fund. We can’t afford to let polluters off the hook, and cleaning up the Chesapeake is a major priority for my office.

Fracking Ban & Fracking Wastewater Ban
Fracking damages the environment and human health, and we should keep it out of Maryland. Instead, let’s grow our economy by focusing on expanding renewable energy.

Native Plant Species
Maryland’s native plant species are in decline, and this negatively affects the ecology of our state, as well as agriculture and our economy. To address this, the Maryland Botanical Heritage Work Group is currently finalizing recommendations for the general assembly. As a member of the work group I will likely submit legislation that matches their recommendations.

I’m also looking at water consumption at power plants, as well as several other issues regarding energy and the environment. Please stay tuned, and have a great weekend!

Sincerely,

Shane

What we accomplished this session

Dear Friend,

I write from Annapolis following the close of my third legislative session and proud of the work the state legislature accomplished this year. We passed a balanced budget that includes record funding for public schools; invested in renewable energy by passing off-shore wind legislation; improved public safety with stricter gun control measures; expanded early voting; and continued to work on cleaning up one of Maryland’s greatest assets and treasures—the Chesapeake Bay. Indeed, it has been a productive session.

Our primary duty every session is to pass a budget. This year’s plan devoted 83 cents of every general fund dollar to education, health, and public safety, continued funding for programs credited with allowing Maryland to recoup 80% of the jobs lost during the recession, increased local police aid to a 20-year high, formed two new State Trooper classes, and placed more funds in the rainy day reserve to better position our state for federal cuts brought on by sequestration.

One of the most important pieces of legislation we passed repealed the death penalty. I am proud to live in a state that will no longer sanction execution. And I am proud of the tireless work of the organizers who made this victory possible. No longer will we have to worry that an innocent man or woman may be put to death by the state. And no longer will we have to waste money on a practice that has been outlawed by 128 countries.

Another vital bill that passed addressed our aging transportation infrastructure, providing $700 million annually for road and transit projects. Anyone who drives in the area understands the necessity of improving the congestion on our roadways. I am relieved that we finally began the process of investing more in road repair and maintenance.

My bills dealing with hydraulic fracturing—or “fracking”—both stalled in the legislature; however my concerns regarding this process of natural gas extension remain, and my work on this issue will continue. Our wastewater treatment facilities lack the capacity to handle fracking wastewater. Ignoring this problem, and sending the wastewater there regardless, is asking for trouble. What is more, spills have become increasingly common as drilling operations increase nationwide. We have a duty to protect our citizens and waterways from harmful chemicals and I will continue to work to ensure that we fulfill this obligation.

Ultimately, I remain unconvinced that fracking can be conducted safely: Water contamination and seismic activity continue to be frequent side effects of drilling operations. Making matters worse, methane leaks during the fracking process make it at least as big of a climate change contributor as coal. We should be focusing more on incentivizing the development of cleaner technologies rather than pivoting to an increased reliance on another fossil fuel. I will continue to push for our state to dedicate its resources towards researching renewable energy sources.

As a member of the Environmental Matters Committee, I have worked to implement and propose practices that ensure that our natural resources are preserved for the next generation. And so I was proud that the two bills I passed this session will do exactly that: One permanently extends funding for the Chesapeake Conservation Corps—an extremely successful program that furthers Chesapeake Bay conservation efforts; the other creates a workgroup that will research and recommend proposals designed to preserve native plant species and reverse their troubling decline.

Many of you contacted me this session about implementing a statewide spay and neuter program. After working with the task force that developed the bill, it was rewarding to see it pass this session. Over 45,000 animals are euthanized annually in Maryland due to overcrowded shelters. Hopefully, this program will be part of a comprehensive solution to this entirely preventable tragedy.

I was also a proud supporter of a measure to allow qualifying undocumented immigrants to obtain a driver’s license. Our nation was founded by immigrants who came here in search of opportunity. Currently, there are millions of undocumented individuals providing services upon which society relies. Indeed, we are stronger because of our diversity, not in spite of it. And so I will welcome with open arms any new Marylanders who may come as a result of this progressive change. And I will know that we will continue to thrive—both economically and socially—if we legislate in a manner that acknowledges reality rather than ignores it.

I was also proud to vote for a bill that empowers doctors and patients to decide what medicines work best for treating debilitating diseases like cancer and multiple sclerosis. It is simply nonsensical that narcotics—infinitely more easily abused than marijuana—are prescribed daily, while cancer patients are denied a therapeutic respite because elements of our public policy remain based on culture mores from five decades ago. Science has discovered multiple medicinal uses for marijuana, and many researchers feel that removing superfluous impediments to conducting further research will result in countless more. Our passage of a bill legalizing medical marijuana is an important step forward in that regard.

It was a pleasure serving you this year and I look forward to the work that remains next session. As always, please feel free to reach out in the interim and I look forward to hearing from you.

Sincerely,
Shane

Annapolis Update — 3/7/13

Friend,

This week, the administration proposed a $3.1 billion transportation funding bill to address road congestion, aging infrastructure and job creation. It is no secret that our state is plagued by some of the nation’s worst traffic. Decreasing the time we spend on the road not only benefits our quality of life, but our economy as well. This plan will provide $700 million annually for road and transit projects through a phased-in 4% gas tax. This approach allows us to maintain funding for public safety, schools and other vital services, unlike Virginia’s recently passed transportation plan that instituted significant cuts. What is more, there will be no tax on hybrid or electric vehicles (another tactic utilized by Virginia). We need to incentivize consumers to seek out cleaner transportation, not discourage them. Furthermore, the majority of our roadways are aging. The longer we wait to address this unfortunate truth the more expensive and burdensome it will be.

In other news, the death penalty repeal bill has passed the Senate and will likely be on the House floor next week. I look forward to voting in favor of repeal and hope we will be sending the bill Governor O’Malley’s desk.

Lastly, my bill to ban fracking failed to make it out of committee in the Senate so I decided to withdraw the bill in the House. However, the hearing on my legislation to prevent fracking wastewater storage in Maryland will be held tomorrow. Our treatment facilities lack the capacity to handle this toxic waste. Ignoring this problem and sending wastewater there regardless is asking for trouble. What is more, spills have become increasingly common as drilling operations increase nationwide. We have a duty to protect our citizens and waterways from harmful chemicals. This bill would do exactly that.

Sincerely,
Shane

Annapolis Update — 2/22/13

Friend,

Maryland is headed in the right direction. Yesterday, the death penalty repeal passed out of the Senate Judiciary Committee; it will be on the Senate floor on Tuesday. We are one step closer to fixing a glaring problem with our justice system and saving the state millions of dollars. I will continue to do whatever I can to help shepherd the bill through the House and send it to Governor O’Malley’s desk.

As for offshore wind power, the House did its part Friday–the bill passed 86-48. Now, we wait and hope that the Senate follows suit. If this bill passes, Maryland will position itself as a leader in the renewable energy movement. The project will create hundreds of jobs, but that is just the beginning. You see, Maryland can carve out a niche in this arena that can attract investment and motivate other states to join us in being part of the solution to our energy crisis rather than the problem.

“Fracking” is another vital front in this fight. As you know, I introduced a bill that will prohibit this process of natural gas extraction. In Maryland, we are listening and have been for some time. Many of us understand that what is billed as a panacea is frequently far from it. Such is the case with natural gas. Significant amounts of methane leak during fracking, rendering it more of a greenhouse gas contributor than coal. What is more, even if regulations are adopted to address this concern, fracking requires massive amounts of water–approximately, 3.5 million gallons per well head. As sources of clean water dwindle worldwide, how can we justify that
resource allocation?

Add in the opportunity cost–researching fracking in Maryland prevents us from focusing on developing renewable energy sources like wind and solar–and that Maryland sits on a relatively minuscule amount of natural gas (undermining the argument that it would bring a significant amount of jobs to our state) and it should be easy to understand why Marylanders like me aren’t drinking the fracking kool aid.

So yes, I want to ban fracking in Maryland. No moratorium. No myopic regulations. And no adding another method of
releasing carbon and methane into our imperiled atmosphere.

Best,
Shane

p.s.– On Friday, we commemorated the 100th anniversary of the women’s suffrage procession from New York to DC in 1913. Unfortunately, we still have a long way to go until there is true equality between men and women. We must use this moment as an impetus to pass laws that move us closer to realizing that goal. The memory of those who we honored this morning deserves as much.

Annapolis Update — 1/18/13

Friend,
I wanted to update you on several bills I will be working on this session:

Fracking Ban–You have heard from me numerous times on this issue before. At a time when we should be investing in renewable energy sources we should not permit companies to implement a process of natural gas extraction that has contaminated water, caused earthquakes, and contributed to global warming. Instead, let’s ban fracking and invest in renewable energy sources like wind. There is a tremendous opportunity for us to create jobs and implement renewable energy practices that other states can follow; we just need to seize it.

Toxic Materials– Would you be comfortable letting your children play on ball fields or in school yards that have been contaminated with dangerous chemicals? Me neither. This session, I am putting in two bills that deal with this issue. One requires that any dredged material from lakes be tested for contaminants prior to being spread on public fields; another prevents pesticides from being used on ornamental lawns outside schools and childcare centers.

Beavers– Beavers have occasionally caused problems for the population of district 39, but as it stands now they are on a list of animals that must be euthanized rather than relocated. As an animal rights activist, I feel strongly that our environmental professionals need room in our laws to operate in the manner they see fit. Wildlife management officials should be empowered with the capacity to relocate populations of animals consistent with best practices in the field.

Chesapeake Bay Conservation Corps — This program has been successful since its infancy in providing opportunities for AmeriCorps members to work towards maintaining and improving the health of the Chesapeake Bay, one of Maryland’s most vital economic and environmental resources. My bill would ensure that the CBCC remains fiscally sustainable.

I am also looking at filing several other bills and promise to keep you updated as the session progresses.

Best,
Shane

Annapolis Update — 1/11/13

Friend,

This week marks the beginning of my third legislative session representing you in Annapolis. As such, I write to update you on some of my legislative priorities for the next three months:

  • First, some good news. This week, Maryland’s schools were ranked first in the nation for the fifth year in a row. This is a testament to the tireless dedication of our teachers and school administrators and years of policy that have prioritized education in our state. I’m proud to live in Maryland where sending my children to public school is a privilege rather than a compromise. As long as I represent you in Annapolis, promoting and implementing sound education policy will be one of my chief priorities.
  • Ensuring that “fracking”–a process of natural gas extraction that has contaminated water and caused earthquakes–never occurs in Maryland, will also be a focus of mine this year. I have not seen evidence that fracking can be done safely, and it is bad policy to proceed as though there are no public health concerns associated with the practice. Furthermore, we should be spending more time and energy focusing on promoting investment in renewable energy sources. To that end, I will be supporting Governor O’Malley’s wind power initiative. As a member of the Environmental Matters Committee, I feel a particular responsibility to be working on these issues and hope that you will contact me with any ideas you have to decrease our dependence on fossil fuels.
  • My inbox has been flooded with inquiries regarding potential gun control efforts. In the wake of the unspeakable tragedy in Newtown, I think it is clear that we need to do what we can in Maryland to restrict access to assault weapons. As President Obama said: “No single law, no set of laws can eliminate evil from the world or prevent every senseless act of violence in our society, but that can’t be an excuse for inaction…If there’s even one step we can take to save another child or another parent or another town from the grief that’s visited Tucson and Aurora and Oak Creek and Newtown and communities from Columbine to Blacksburg before that, then surely we have an obligation to try.
  • “We also have an opportunity this session to abolish the death penalty. In short, I feel that the practice is immoral–the risk of executing an innocent man or woman is too high to continue instituting capital punishment. DNA testing has cast doubts on numerous prior cases, an unfortunate fact that should serve to remind us that our justice system, while undoubtedly one of the world’s best, is not infallible.

As always, please continue to contact my office with your ideas and concerns. I am in Annapolis to serve you and look forward to getting to know more of my constituents this session.

Best,
Shane

p.s.- Next week, I will be updating you on the bills I plan to file this year.

Pushing for a ban on hydraulic fracturing

Friends,

As many of you now know, I have been pushing hard for a ban on hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking” in Maryland; and, to that end, will be introducing legislation that would accomplish this goal this coming session.

Recently, I had the opportunity to speak at an Environment Maryland event on the issue and made the following points:

  • A ban is not only the appropriate course of action for the environment, it is the solution favored by the constituents I’ve been speaking with–scientists, business owners, teachers, parents, et al.
  • I don’t want our land to be a testing ground for a flawed process: We shouldn’t be risking public and environmental health so that massive energy companies can profit financially by extracting more fossil fuels. Instead, we should be focusing on improving renewable energy sources in Maryland, such as offshore wind energy.
  • The argument that it will bring jobs to our state is a fallacy: Studies have shown an average of two jobs created per well, the majority of which go to out-of-state workers with experience in the field. Also, the extracted gas may end up being shipped overseas.

The good news is that we don’t need to frack Maryland. We can preserve our environment and protect our public health while working to become a national leader in renewable energy. At the state level, we can implement policies that prioritize renewable energy, instead of doing the bidding of the oil and gas industry by expanding fossil fuel extraction. But, to be successful, we need to come together. Please join me, along with organizations like Food and Water Watch and Environment Maryland, as we fight for a clean energy future.

If you support my efforts you can contribute financially here and sign a petition to ban fracking in Maryland here.

I look forward to hearing from you on fracking and other issues as the legislative session draws near.

Best,
Shane

USGS Report Points to Gas Reserves Across Maryland

Friend,

Fracking just became a much bigger danger to Maryland: A new United States Geological Survey Report indicates that there are gas reserves across Maryland; possibly even in Montgomery County. Not all of these reserves have been assessed by the USGS, but the reserve in southern Maryland that has been likely contains more than two-thirds the amount of gas that is located in the Marcellus region of western Maryland — a significant amount. Furthermore, gas can be extracted from these new reserves using the same hydraulic fracturing, or “fracking”, process that the gas industry is attempting to employ in western Maryland. What some would view as a western Maryland issue, has undeniably become a statewide issue.

As you may know, I have spent a great deal of time and energy working on the issue of whether fracking should be allowed in Maryland. My position has been clear: the burden is on the gas companies to prove it can be done safely, and since they have failed to do so it should be banned. No amount of natural gas is worth endangering the air that we breath and the water that we drink.

People have said: “Why is a Montgomery County Delegate working on this issue when the shale is in western Maryland?” My response has been that air and water quality is not just a local issue — it impacts all of Maryland. This remains the case, but the recent USGS report shows that fracking could be coming to our backyard in the near future if we don’t act. And so we must ask ourselves: Do we want to risk our children drinking contaminated water and breathing toxic air?

Please stay tuned for further developments.

Best,
Shane

By Authority: Friends of Shane Robinson; Mary Robinson, Treasurer.